Inside The V&A’s Wedding Dresses Exhibition

V&A Wedding dress Exhibition

Victoria&Albert Museum, London, 3 May 2014 – 15 March 2015

Wondering about a tailor made gown for your Mediterranean Wedding but don’t know where to draw inspiration? Take a look at our gallery from Wedding Dresses 1775-2014 at V&A and contact us!

The exhibition traces the development of the fashionable white wedding dress and its treatment by key fashion designers such as Charles Frederick Worth, Norman Hartnell, Charles James, John Galliano, Christian Lacroix, Vivienne Westwood and Vera Wang offering a panorama of fashion over the last two centuries. Telling the story of the evolution of the bridal gown – from when white first became de rigueur to the increased media focus on high-profile nuptials – the exhibition is displayed across two floors, opening on the first with the oldest gowns from the late-18th century and then showcasing the last 50 years of fashion on the mezzanine level. It investigates the histories of the garments, revealing fascinating and personal details about the lives of the wearers, giving an intimate insight into their occupations, circumstances and fashion choices.

Curator Edwina Ehrman worked on the exhibition for five years, acquiring many new pieces for the museum’s archive along the way and filling many of the gaps in its extensive collection of wedding fashion. “I wanted the exhibition to involve ordinary people, not just weddings we’ve seen before,” she told The Guardian. “In the 1930s, the Duchess of Windsor’s ‘Wallis blue’ dress was incredibly influential.”

An image of Alexander McQueen’s dress for Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, is projected onto a large wall amid swaying union flags.

And if you look for something more bizarre, don’t forget the purple dress worn by Dita Von Teese for her marriage to Marilyn Manson and the outfits worn by Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale on their wedding day.

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